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Welcome to PlanningSkills.COM

This website focuses on a wide variety of topics related to organization and individual planning situations. The primary focus is business planning.

Planning is an anticipatory decision making process that involves situation analysis, forecasting outcomes and events, evaluating alternative courses of action, anticipating consequences and considering implementation issues and contingencies. Planning often begins with asking one or more questions, for example: What if ...? Could we ...? Do we ...? Is it possible...? How should we respond ...? How can we ...? Is it feasible to ...?

In general, planning is a proactive process that is intended to help individuals, groups and organizations achieve performance objectives.



Featured Glossary Term

Brainstorming

Brainstorming is a technique that encourages individual team members to free themselves from any inhibitions and constraints and to generate as many creative ideas about a situation as possible. Brainstorming is generally useful for generating ideas.

According to Alex Osborn, brainstorming is "a conference technique by which a group attempts to find a solution for a specific problem by amassing all the ideas spontaneously by its members."

Brainstorming is a process designed to obtain the maximum number of ideas relating to a specific area of interest. Brainstorming occurs during a fixed period of time dedicated to generating a large number of ideas regardless of their initial perceived worth. Brainstorming is the free association of different ideas to form new ideas and concepts. Also, brainstorming is a part of problem solving which involves the creation of new ideas by suspending judgment.


Featured Planning Tip

What gets measured, gets managed! Peter Drucker once said, “What gets measured, gets managed.” He recognized that managers need to understand how the unit, organization or individual is performing to get better at doing it and hence improve performance. A problem also occurs when we measure the wrong outcome and try to manage to improve that outcome and hope to improve what we really want to occur. Bad measurement can actually be worse than no measurement!





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Copyright © 2004-12 by D. J. Power (see his home page). PlanningSkills.COMsm is maintained by Alexander P. and Daniel J. Power. Please contact them at djpower1950@gmail.com with questions. See disclaimer and privacy statement. This page was last modified on Monday, July 30, 2012.
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